*Evans, N. S., Schlesinger, M. A., Hopkins, E. J., Jaeger, G. J., Golinkoff, R. M., & Hirsh-Pasek, K. (2021). Are preschoolers creative? A review of the literature. In S. W. Russ, J. D. Hoffmann, & J. C. Kaufman (Eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Lifespan Development of Creativity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hopkins, E. J., & Lillard, A. S. (2021). The Magic School bus dilemma: How fantasy affects children’s learning from stories. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. Manuscript accepted for publication.

Hopkins, E. J., & Weisberg, D. S. (2021). Investigating the effectiveness of fantasy stories for teaching scientific principles. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 203, 15047. Get PDF

Weisberg, D. S., & Hopkins, E. J. (2020). Preschoolers’ extension and export of information from realistic and fantastical stories. Infant and Child Development, 29(4), e2182. Get PDF

Dore, R. A., Shirilla, M., Hopkins, E. J., Collins, M., Scott, M., Schatz, J., Lawson-Adams, J., Valladares, T., Foster, L., Puttre, H., Toub, T. S., Hadley, E., Golinkoff, R. M., Dickinson, D., & Hirsh-Pasek, K. (2019). Education in the app store: Using a mobile game to support preschoolers’ vocabulary learning. Journal of Children and Media, 13(4), 452-471. Get PDF

Hopkins, E. J., Weisberg, D. S., & Taylor, J. C. V. (2019). Does expertise moderate the seductive allure of reductive explanations? Acta Psychologica, 198. Get PDF

Hopkins, E. J., Toub, T. S., Hassinger-Das, B., Golinkoff, R. M., & Hirsh-Pasek, K. (2019). Playing for the future: Redefining early childhood education. In D. Whitebread et al. (Eds.), The SAGE Handbook of Developmental Psychology and Early Childhood Education. SAGE Publications Ltd. More information

Weisberg, D. S., Hopkins, E. J., & Taylor, J. C. V. (2018). People's explanatory preferences for scientific phenomena. Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, 3(44). Open access article

Zosh, J. M., Hirsh-Pasek, K., Hopkins, E. J., Jensen, H., Liu, C., Neale, D., Solis, S. L., & Whitebread, D. (2018). Accessing the inaccessible: Redefining play as a spectrum. Frontiers in Psychology, 9, 1124. Get PDF

Hopkins, E. J., & Weisberg, D. S. (2017). The youngest readers' dilemma: A review of children's learning from fictional sources. Developmental Review, 43, 47-70. Get PDF

Liu, C., Solis, S. L., Jensen, H., Hopkins, E. J., Neale, D., Zosh, J., Hirsh-Pasek, K., & Whitebread, D. (2017). Neuroscience and learning through play: A review of the evidence. Billund, Denmark: The LEGO Foundation. Get PDF

 

Whitebread, D., Neale, D., Jensen, H., Liu, C., Solis, L. S., Hopkins, E. J., Hirsh-Pasek, K., & Zosh, J. (2017). The role of play in children’s development: A review of the evidence. Billund, Denmark: The LEGO Foundation. Get PDF

 

Zosh, J., Hopkins, E. J., Jensen, H., Liu, C., Neale, D., Hirsh-Pasek, K., Solis, S. L., & Whitebread, D. (2017). Learning through play: A review of the evidence. Billund, Denmark: The LEGO Foundation. Get PDF

Hopkins, E. J., Weisberg, D. S., & Taylor, J. C. V. (2016). Examining the specificity of the seductive allure effect. In A. Papafragou, D. Grodner, D. Mirman, & J. C. Trueswell (Eds.), Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Philadelphia, PA: Cognitive Science Society. Get PDF

Hopkins, E. J., Weisberg, D. S., & Taylor, J. C. V. (2016). The seductive allure is a reductive allure: People prefer scientific explanations that contain logically irrelevant reductive information. Cognition, 155, 67-76.

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Hopkins, E. J., Smith, E. D., Weisberg, D. S., & Lillard, A. S. (2016). The development of substitute object pretense: The differential importance of form and function. Journal of Cognition and Development, 17(2), 197-220. Get PDF

Weisberg, D. S., Taylor, J. C. V., & Hopkins, E. J. (2015). Deconstructing the seductive allure of neuroscience explanations. Judgment and Decision Making, 10(5), 429-441. Get PDF

Hopkins, E. J., Dore, R. A., & Lillard, A. S. (2015). Do children learn from pretense? Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 130, 1-18. Get PDF

Lillard, A. S., Dore, R. A., Hopkins, E. J., & Smith, E. D. (2015). Challenges to research on play: Mending the methodological mistakes. In J. E. Johnson, S. G. Eberle, T. S. Henricks, & D. Kuschner (Eds.), The handbook of the study of play (pp. 445–452). Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. Get PDF

Lillard, A. S., Lerner, M. D., Hopkins, E. J., Dore, R., Smith, E. D., & Palmquist, C. M. (2013). The impact of pretend play on children’s development: The state of the evidence. Psychological Bulletin, 139(1), 1-34.

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Lillard, A. S., Hopkins, E. J., Dore, R. A., Palmquist, C. M., Lerner, M. D., & Smith, E. D. (2013). Concepts and theories, methods and reasons: Why do the children (pretend) play? Reply to Weisberg, Hirsh-Pasek, and Golinkoff (2013); Bergen (2013); and Walker and Gopnik (2013). Psychological Bulletin, 139(1), 49-52.

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Schnellmann, A. (2019, May 22). Learning new words through play. [Blog post]. Blog On Learning and Development.

Hassinger-Das, B., & Hopkins, E. J. (2017, September 8). Don’t fear for the digital natives: Play in the digital age. [Blog post]. Huffington Post.

Zosh, J., Hopkins, E. J., Hirsh-Pasek, K., Liu, C., Solis, L., Neale, D., Whitebread, D., & Jensen, H. (2017, June). What do we mean by learning through play. The Lego Foundation Centre for Creativity, Play, and Learning. 

 

Liberman, M. (2016, August 25). Language Log literally changes your brain [Blog post]. Language Log.

 

Willingham, D. (2016, August 16). We like reductive explanations, especially brainy ones. [Blog post]. Daniel Willingham - Science and Education Blog.

 

Loria, K. (2016, July 13). Scientists discovered an absurdly easy way to seem convincing. Business Insider.

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